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Beginners Guide To External Flash For Your dSLR, Manual & Automatic

Trust me, if you want to improve your photography, an add-on speedlite / flash / strobe is a wonderful accessory. It can be confusing trying to understand the difference between manual and automatic flashes, so in this video I explain the basics.

Thanks, Rob.
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17 comments

  1. At around 740 you state that aperture controls ambient light, not true. In manual flash with camera on manual shutter speed controls ambient and aperture controls subject exposure. In manual mode with shutter speed set to max ambient will always be underexposed, better to set shutter speed to 125 initially.

  2. Thanks Rob and good luck ! ;)

  3. DentalWorkz Studio

    Great video! Thanks Rob!

  4. Thanks Rob.. Just one question. Can I use a trigger to fire Canon Speedlite 430EXII Flash with Nikon D5200 and if so which trigger?

  5. Thank you for the video! I just bought a Sigma flash for my canon DSLR which is fully automatic. I can't wait to start using it! very informational video! Great work!

  6. 5.13 lol
    very good tho . thankyou =)

  7. Hi, Rob…

    Very informative intro to modern flash photography. Currently I'm trending toward Yong Nuo, too, for my Canon EOS. However, I love playing with vintage film cameras, too, so my question is: Can these modern TTL flashes work with old 35mm film cameras (like a Pentax Spotmatic) which are purely mechanically actuated? They "communicate" with flash units wired to an "X" or "FP" receptacle on the camera body itself.

  8. Hi there, I have a Nikon D5200. Can i please ask you which flash would you recommend me using (automatic or manual) because i love taking picture of my family and and nature. I would like to purchase one but have no idea where to start it's my first time. :( Something cost effective i'm not looking for anything too expensive.

    Thanks.

  9. thankyou. i am a beginning on club photography and i just brought a external flash, this helped me so much!!!!

  10. In low light situations when photographing people you can set up your shutter speed easily at 1/60 of a second and not at 1/200 because the light from flash is the one that will freeze the action not the speed of the shutter :)

  11. Rob can you help me? I have the problem with my new speedlite. Problem is that the I take a picture, and picture comes out dark, like very very dark, what's the problem? I'm using Canon EOS 1100D and MeiKe MK951.

  12. Rob,
    I have pulled from my old camera bag a flashgun that I used with my old Practika SLR. This flash is a HanimexTz1*34 Manual and TTL metering. My modern camera is a Fuji S200EXR digital Bridge camera. I have tried the flash manually and used the TTL setting, to my surprise it works, this flash was bought in the 80s not cheap. I have seen a mention regarding voltage on the old flashguns could fry the electronics on the modern camera. I'm undecided whether to abandon and by a modern flash, The few tests I've done seem ok and the camera too. I await your advise…

    Regards : Jim

  13. Thank you for the great information, you have told me a lot about external flashes ^_^

  14. Very informative. Having just got my first external flash gun, this was one of the more helpful videos!

  15. OfficialRussianGamer

    Rob Nunn, honestly you must be crazed about the size of your camera compared to your flash because the flash is almost the size of your camera or maybe more.

  16. Thanks Rob, I really enjoy your videos to start out. You make remembering that Aperture controls the ambient lighting and not the flash. I also use Canon equipment but love the YN flashes.  I use the manual models and love playing with light and aperture settings to blacken out my backgrounds with stunning lights on my subjects. People cannot believe the blacked out background was a room with a T.V on and room lights. Aperture control blackened out the background to make it look like it was a dark room…..Thanks again for your work on your YouTube page as you really put a lot of work into it

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